The atmosphere of a new ultra hot Jupiter is analyzed

Date:

Share post:

The combination of observations made with the CARMENES spectrograph on the 3.5m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (Almería), and the HARPS-N spectrograph on the National Galileo Telescope (TNG) at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía, La Palma) has enabled a team from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) to reveal new details about this extrasolar planet, which has a surface temperature of around 2000 K.

The atmosphere of a new ultra hot Jupiter is analyzed
Artist’s impression of ultra hot Jupiter MASCARA-2B/KELT-20b
[Credit: Gabriel Pérez Díaz, SMM (IAC)]

MASCARA-2B/KELT-20b is an ultra hot Jupiter. It belongs to a new group of exoplanets, the hottest known until now, which can reach temperatures at the surface of over 2,000 K. The reason for its high temperature is the proximity of its orbit around its host star, causing it to receive a large flux of radiation in the upper layers of its atmosphere.




The team, led by IAC researcher Núria Casasayas, which had already made initial measurements of the atmosphere during 2018, observed the planet during four transits. They used the HARP-N spectrograph on the National Galileo Telescope (TNG) at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía, La Palma) and the CARMENES spectrograph on the 3.5 m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory (Almería).

Artistic simulation of ultra hot Jupiter MASCARA-2B/KELT-20b
[Credit: Gabriel Pérez Díaz, SMM (IAC)]

“The two instruments sample slightly different wavelength regions, which allows us to sample a wider spectral range,” explains Casasayas. She adds: “We have been able to detect hydrogen beta, singly ionized iron and magnesium with data from HARPS-N, while the presence of ionized calcium was detected only by using CARMENES. Neutral sodium and hydrogen alpha are detected with both instruments.”




The study of exoplanetary atmospheres has become front line research in recent years. Instruments that perform high-resolution spectroscopy allow us not only to discover the atmospheric composition of planets outside the Solar System, but also to measure other important parameters such as the temperatures of the layers where their constituents are found, and other parameters of the dynamics of the atmosphere.

Source: Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias [June 11, 2019]

ADVERTISEMENT

spot_img

Related articles

Mercury’s volcanic activity – or lack of it – could help astronomers find other Earth-like worlds

If you wanted to narrow down the search for Earth-like worlds in a vast universe, how might you...

ALMA captures stirred-up planet factory

Planet-forming environments can be much more complex and chaotic than previously expected. This is evidenced by a new...

Research reveals an enormous planet quickly orbiting a tiny, dying star

Thanks to a bevy of telescopes in space and on Earth -- and even a pair of amateur...

Astronomers reveal contents of mysterious black hole jets

An international team of astronomers has answered a long standing question about the enigmatic jets emitted by black...

NASA Mars Rover finds mineral vein deposited by water

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has found bright veins of a mineral, apparently gypsum, deposited by water. Analysis...

Insulating crust kept cryomagma liquid for millions of years on nearby dwarf planet

A recent NASA mission to the dwarf planet Ceres found brilliant, white spots of salts on its surface....

First evidence of rocky planet formation in Tatooine system

Evidence of planetary debris surrounding a double sun, 'Tatooine-like' system has been found for the first time by...

Tiny drops of ‘perfect’ fluid existed in the early universe

Smashing large atomic nuclei, containing protons and neutrons, together at close to the speed of light re-creates the...