Roman floor mosaics brought to light at Negrar di Valpolicella, Verona

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Archaeologists of the Superintendence of Archaeology, Fine Arts and Landscape of Verona are bringing to light the magnificent floor mosaics and foundations of a Roman villa dating back to the third century AD. The villa, which was first discovered in the 1920s at Negrar di Valpolicella, near Verona, had remained buried since then and was all but forgotten.

Roman floor mosaics brought to light at Negrar di Valpolicella, Verona
Credit: SAP Società Archeologica




In summer 2019 the technicians of the Superintendence of Archaeology, Fine Arts and Landscape of Verona returned to the site after almost a century, under the direction of the archaeologist Gianni de Zuccato. The investigations continued in October 2019 and in February of this year, until they came to a standstill due to the coronavirus emergency.

Roman floor mosaics brought to light at Negrar di Valpolicella, Verona
Roman floor mosaics brought to light at Negrar di Valpolicella, Verona
Roman floor mosaics brought to light at Negrar di Valpolicella, Verona
Credit: SAP Società Archeologica




In May the archaeologists resumed the excavation and within a week of digging trenches between the rows of vines they managed to locate part of the villa’s mosaic floors and foundations. “For the moment”, said de Zuccato, “our objective is simply to ascertain the exact dimensions of the ancient building.”
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Roman floor mosaics brought to light at Negrar di Valpolicella, Verona
Credit: SAP Società Archeologica

Roberto Grison, mayor of Negrar di Valpolicella, is also excited with the rediscovery of the villa. “We believe that a cultural site of such value deserves attention and should be enhanced,” he said. “That’s why, together with the Superintendence and the private owners of the land, we will find a way to fund the excavation and make this treasure available to the wider public.”

Source: L’Arena [trsl. TANN, May 26, 2020]

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