Protohistoric cremation burials unearthed near northeastern Italian town of Gatteo

Date:

Share post:

The archaeological excavations in Gatteo, near the A14 motorway exit “Valle del Rubicone” between Via Campagnola and Via Mistadella, in the Italian Province of Forlì-Cesena in the northeastern region of Emilia-Romagna, have revealed an important archaeological site dating back to proto-historic and Roman times. The excavations, which began in October 2018, ended just a week ago with the execution of the last investigations, for a total duration of two years.

Protohistoric cremation burials unearthed near northeastern Italian town of Gatteo
Credit: Municipality of Gatteo

A significant duration for an archaeological excavation, determined by the importance of what was found and the vastness of the area under investigation, with a surface area of 40,000 sq.m. and another 10,000 sq.m. for the surveys carried out on the section of road that will connect to the tollgate (total surface area of 5 hectares).




The archaeological excavation has brought to light important evidence of the exploitation of an area marked by the Rubicone river route: a group of rich burials from the Orientalizing Age, a protohistoric village with traces of activities linked to daily life and handicraft production, as well as evidence of a particularly well-organized defensive system that leads to the location of a Roman camp, frequented from the Republican period until the late Antique period.

Protohistoric cremation burials unearthed near northeastern Italian town of Gatteo

Protohistoric cremation burials unearthed near northeastern Italian town of Gatteo
Credit: Municipality of Gatteo

The site of Gatteo appears to be related to the itinerant network, in which the passage of the Rubicone river was a reference point and in relation to which the excavation documented a road axis, indicated by the lateral guard ditches, which connected the coast towards the interior, proceeding in the direction of the Compito and then the Via Emilia. These routes, which constituted elements of attraction and aggregating hubs in relation to the circulation of goods and people, must have been active since pre-protohistoric times and were then resumed in the Roman road network.




During the operations carried out on site, a small nucleus of six cremation burials emerged, which can be dated between the end of the 8th and the first half of the 7th century BC, characterised by grave goods made of amber, bronze and ceramic materials, as well as organic material such as wood. Among the documented objects, there are ornaments from women’s burials (fibulae, earrings and belts) and weapons for men’s burials (iron and bronze spear heads). Of exceptional importance is the recovery of a wooden piece of furniture, probably a small throne, used as a support for the cinerary urn of Tomb n. 3.

Protohistoric cremation burials unearthed near northeastern Italian town of Gatteo

Protohistoric cremation burials unearthed near northeastern Italian town of Gatteo
Credit: Municipality of Gatteo

Particularly interesting is the connection with the archaeological documentation of Verucchio and its necropolis, considering that the sites in this phase appear to be located mostly on high ground, while here we are in a stretch of lowland more than 20 km from what in this phase is the hegemonic centre of the territory.

Author: Alessandro Mazza | Source: Living Cesenatico [trsl. TANN, September 23, 2020]

Support The Archaeology News Network with a small donation!




ADVERTISEMENT

spot_img

Related articles

Fossil pollen record suggests vulnerability to mass extinction ahead

Reduced resilience of plant biomes in North America could be setting the stage for the kind of mass...

Between shark and ray: The evolutionary advantage of the sea angels

Angel sharks are sharks, but with their peculiarly flat body they rather resemble rays. An international research team...

Remarkable complex of early Neolithic monuments discovered in Herefordshire, England

Advanced radiocarbon dating has been used by archaeologists to determine the age of Neolithic structures on Dorstone Hill...

Ancient Chinese bronze mirror unearthed whole in Fukuoka dig

A remarkably preserved 1,900-year-old bronze mirror made in China around the early second century was unearthed whole at...

Egypt starts radar scans for secret rooms behind Tutankhamun’s tomb

Egypt's Antiquities Ministry says archaeologists are starting radar scans of the tomb of famed pharaoh Tutankhamun in the...

Winchester Cathedral’s mortuary chests unlocked

A team of archaeologists and anthropologists from the University of Bristol have been gradually unlocking the secrets hidden...

3,000-year-old settlement unearthed in Ethiopia

A lion's skull, remains of a bronze plaque with an Ethiopian-Sabian inscription and gold objects ready to be...

Multiple origins for agriculture in Fertile Crescent

A rich assemblage of fossils and artifacts in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains in Iran has revealed...