Iraq displays stolen artifacts recovered from UK, Sweden

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Iraqi officials are displaying stolen artifacts from the country’s rich cultural heritage that were recently recovered from Britain and Sweden.

Iraq displays stolen artifacts recovered from UK, Sweden
Recently recovered antiquities are displayed at the foreign ministry, in Baghdad, Iraq,
Monday, July 29, 2019 [Credit: AP/Hadi Mizban]

Many archaeological treasures from Iraq, home of the ancient “fertile crescent” considered the cradle of civilization, were looted during the chaos that followed the 2003 U.S. invasion and whisked out of the country.




Now Iraq is making a massive effort to bring these pieces home, working closely with the U.N. cultural organization.

Iraq displays stolen artifacts recovered from UK, Sweden
The artifacts paraded Monday include archaeological and historical pieces recovered from Britain and Sweden, pottery
fragments and shards with writing dating back to the ancient Sumerian civilization. Iraq is putting a great effort
to restore its lost rich cultural heritage after it was decimated during the chaos that followed
the 2003 U.S. invasion [Credit: AP/Hadi Mizban]

The artifacts on display Monday at the foreign ministry in Baghdad include archaeological and historical items, such as pottery fragments and shards with writing dating back at least 4,000 years to the ancient Sumerian civilization.




Iraqi Foreign Minister Mohammed al-Hakim said his country is determined to recover its lost heritage, whatever it takes.

Source: The Associated Press [July 29, 2019]

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