Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered

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This year’s excavation campaign at the amphitheatre in Volterra  in the area of Porta Diana near the municipal cemetery, has discovered an underground corridor or cryptoporticus that allowed the public to move through the various sectors to the stairwells. 

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered
Credit: L’Anfiteatro Che Non C’era



“We don’t know the actual dimensions of the cryptoporticus at present,” says archaeologist Elena Sorge, who leads the work on the Volterra excavation, “but it is certainly a discovery that crowns the initiatives of the Superintendence.”

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered
Credit: L’Anfiteatro Che Non C’era




“As much as we can ascertain, the cryptoporticus does not show any signs of structural damage. We have reached about ten metres below ground level, and at present the underground tunnel of the Roman amphitheatre seems to be passable for about 7-8 metres, with some parts completely filled with earth.” 

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered

Cryptoporticus of Roman amphitheatre at Volterra discovered
Credit: L’Anfiteatro Che Non C’era



“Our archaeological research will focus on the protection of the cryptoporticus and the slope above it, for which we have already worked with some specialized companies. We are trying to understand the exact place where the access stairs to the amphitheatre were located”.

The current excavation campaign began in mid-July, after the initial discovery in the summer of 2015, and was completed in October.

Source: Il Tirreno [trsl. TANN, November 01, 2020]

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