86 Roman era skeletons discovered under a North Wales college

Date:

Share post:

Some of the skeletons found in an ancient graveyard on Anglesey date back to the 4th Century, experts have said.

86 Roman era skeletons discovered under a North Wales college
Tests showed some of the people buried up to 1,600 years ago were from Scandinavia
and the Mediterranean [Credit: Archaeology Wales]

Wales Archaeology, which led the college dig, found the remains of 34 individuals. Some had been buried in stone-lined coffins.




Tests showed some of the people buried up to 1,600 years ago were from Scandinavia and the Mediterranean.

Some were from the Welsh borders and four were western Britons, said project manager Dr Irene Garcia Rovira.

86 Roman era skeletons discovered under a North Wales college
Quernstone surface revealed during the excavations of the western side
of the early medieval cemetery [Credit: Archaeology Wales]

The findings have been made public following digs carried out during work on the Llangefni link road in 2016 and Coleg Menai’s nearby campus the year after.




Analysis has shown some of those buried did not eat seafood despite being near to the coast. The skeletons included a number of females aged between 18 and 25, perhaps suggesting the dangers of child birth at the time.

The male remains showed they lived up to the age of 45 which was a “reasonable lifespan” for the late Roman and early Medieval period.

86 Roman era skeletons discovered under a North Wales college
The archaeological dig at Coleg Menai Pencraig Campus
[Credit: Archaeology Wales]

Dr Rovira said the site was important because skeletons do not usually survive in the area’s acidic soil.

In 2016, Brython Archaeology said its dig on the link road revealed “cist” graves which each held several bodies, alongside jewellery and French pottery.

Source: BBC News Website [August 02, 2019]

ADVERTISEMENT

spot_img

Related articles

Minoan shipwreck found off Turkish coast

Turkish researchers have discovered a 4,000 year-old shipwreck in Marmaris Hisaronu Gulf opposite the Greek islands of Rhodes...

Unpublished Egyptian texts reveal new insights into ancient medicine

The University of Copenhagen in Denmark is home to a unique collection of Ancient Egyptian papyrus manuscripts. Instructions for...

Research team unravels how dagger in Tutankhamun’s tomb was forged

A Japanese research team has concluded that an iron dagger made of meteorites found in the tomb of...

Bengali mangrove forests are fading away

Mangrove forests of the Sundarbans are disappearing, taking endangered species like the Bengal tiger with them. Sundarbans Mangroves Rapid...

Researchers identify the oldest pieces of Baltic amber found on the Iberian Peninsula: imports began over 5,000 years ago

A team of scientists from the Universities of Granada and Cambridge, as well as the Government of Catalonia,...

130 ancient sites found along Nabucco Route

Bulgarian archaeologists surveying the route of the future Nabucco gas transit pipeline have uncovered about 130 archaeological sites,...

What rabbits can tell us about Neanderthal extinction?

When thinking about the extinction of Neanderthals some 30,000 years ago, rabbits may not be the first thing...

DNA from Viking cod bones suggests 1,000-year history of European fish trade

Norway is famed for its cod. Catches from the Arctic stock that spawns each year off its northern...