2017 likely to be third warmest year on record

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The latest estimate for 2017 suggests the year will be the second or third warmest in a record stretching back to 1850.

2017 likely to be third warmest year on record
2017 is likely to be one of the warmest years for global average surface temperature 
according to new research [Credit: University of East Anglia]

Although 2017 isn’t likely to break the record global mean surface temperatures set over the previous two years, climate scientists regard this year’s figure as noteworthy because it will be the warmest year in the series which hasn’t been influenced by an El Niño – the warm phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation in the tropical Pacific.

The assessment is based on  the HadCRUT4 data set – compiled by UEA’s Climatic Research Unit and the Met Office Hadley Centre.

It shows that global mean surface temperatures for January – September were 0.42°C ± 0.09°C above the 1981–2010 long-term average (or 0.71°C ± 0.10°C above the 1961–1990 long-term average).

Although there are still three months to go, it is likely that 2017 will be the third consecutive year of exceptionally high average surface global temperatures, despite the emergence of cooler conditions in the Pacific.

2017 likely to be third warmest year on record
Credit: University of East Anglia

The World Meteorological Organization’s estimate reveals that 2017 is likely to be one of the three hottest years on record together with 2015 and 2016. The WMO bases its temperature assessment on datasets from several organisations, including the HadCRUT4 dataset.

Although 2017 isn’t likely to break the record global mean surface temperatures set over the previous two years, climate scientists regard this year’s figure as noteworthy because it will be the warmest year in the series which hasn’t been influenced by an El Niño – the warm phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation in the tropical Pacific.

The assessment is based on  the HadCRUT4 data set – compiled by UEA’s Climatic Research Unit and the Met Office Hadley Centre.

It shows that global mean surface temperatures for January – September were 0.42°C ± 0.09°C above the 1981–2010 long-term average (or 0.71°C ± 0.10°C above the 1961–1990 long-term average).

Although there are still three months to go, it is likely that 2017 will be the third consecutive year of exceptionally high average surface global temperatures, despite the emergence of cooler conditions in the Pacific.

The World Meteorological Organization’s estimate reveals that 2017 is likely to be one of the three hottest years on record together with 2015 and 2016. The WMO bases its temperature assessment on datasets from several organisations, including the HadCRUT4 dataset.

Source: University of East Anglia [November 06, 2017]

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